AVs and Videos

What's the difference between an AV and a video?  We all know a video when we see one - movies. But an AV is a sequence of essentially still images (though a simulation of movement is often used for effect) linked together and synchronised to a soundtrack, which may be music or commentary or both.

An AV is a different art form, and far from being inferior to video, it differs from video and is superior to it in some important ways. Primarily, it focuses on the quality of each image. It is more possible to create a feeling of abstraction through careful use of the still image. It can be emotionally as powerful as video but whereas video is essentially all about movement and interaction between actors or within situations, the still image strips this out to concentrate on the message within the image itself and its associated soundtrack. You may have observed with video that the most powerful shots are often those where there is virtually no movement at all - essentially a video still. 

These pieces are not published for general viewing because of copyright issues. I have often used music from copyright sources that cannot be used publicly without a licence. YouTube use automated music recognition software that will identify any piece of music you have used in a video, and flag it up if it is copyrighted.  It's then likely to be taken off, though I have so far got away with it with my "India - On The Road" AV.  Perhaps because scarcely anyone has seen it!  So these pieces use the Wix player instead.

 

I once approached David Hockney Inc for permission to show an AV containing scenes of his art in my AV "Passing By" on YouTube. And no - David Hockney Inc isn't a kindly old man happy to help an amateur artist, it's a corporation that wanted $500 per image for a five year licence. 

So view them here - before I get that knock on the door! And please view at full screen (click at bottom right of the video frame)  with decent speakers or headphones

Please note: If these high definition videos won't play properly because of slow internet connections, scroll down to the blue section below which has the medium quality 720p versions.

Passing By. 
Images from the 1853 Gallery at Salts Mill.
Music: "Home" by Joe Satriani

Leeds 1974

An almost unbelievable long time ago, when many of the old terraces were being demolished and new high-rise flats were going up. Leeds is like an ever shifting stage set.

With a figure borrowed from Shirley Baker.

Music: "Down, Down, Down" by Joe Satriani

Napier Art Deco Festival

 

The town of Napier, New Zealand, suffered a major earthquake in 1931. The town centre was rebuilt in the Art Deco style, and today it celebrates it's rising from the rubble with an annual Art Deco Festival. Fabulous clothes, beautiful vintage cars.

Six Million Buttons

One of the first AVs I made, inspired by an art installation at Ripon Cathedral in 2010.

Music "The Stoic Theme" by Thomas Newman from the film The Shawshank Redemption.

Tongariro Crossing
A classic day walk across the volcanic moonscape of central North Island, New Zealand. Paddy and I did this in 2008
Napier Art Deco Festival
The town of Napier, New Zealand, suffered a major earthquake in 1931. The town centre was rebuilt in the Art Deco style, and today it celebrates it's rising from the rubble with an annual Art Deco Festival. Fabulous clothes, beautiful vintage cars.
Versions at 720p (medium quality)
Passing By. 
Images from the 1853 Gallery at Salts Mill.
Music: "Home" by Joe Satriani
Leeds 1974

An almost unbelievable long time ago, when many of the old terraces were being demolished and new high-rise flats were going up. Leeds is like an ever shifting stage set.

With a figure borrowed from Shirley Baker.

Music: "Down, Down, Down" by Joe Satriani

Six Million Buttons

One of the first AVs I made, inspired by an art installation at Ripon Cathedral in 2010.

Music "The Stoic Theme" by Thomas Newman from the film The Shawshank Redemption.

Tongariro Crossing
A classic day walk across the volcanic moonscape of central North Island, New Zealand. Paddy and I did this in 2008